Archives For value price

Illustrated By David Stelzl

One of my first experiences with selling cars came early in my marriage when we decided to sell our Dodge van.  The vehicle was in great shape, no major problems, and well taken care of.  I listed it in the newspaper, and a few days later  received a call from a potential buyer.  He was a business owner, running a restaurant, and thought he might be able to use this van for his work.  After driving the van, he agreed it was in good shape, but then started complaining about modifications he would have to make before this van would really meet his need.

There’s an old Proverb that says, “It is good for nothing, cries the buyer.  But when he has gone his way, he boasts”.

The Strategy

In this case, the buyer gives hope that the sale is done, but then starts picking apart the product in an effort to bring the price down.  My car buyer had me believing I had made the sale.  Once he saw me mentally counting the money, he knew he had me.  Instead of paying me, he was looking for sympathy, adding up the costs of modifying the product to meet his needs. In the end, I gave in and sold him the vehicle for much less than it was worth. I felt taken once he left, and I am sure he was boasting on the way home.   I see this in business today.  Buyers will waver back and forth, moaning about changes or features that aren’t just right, looking for sympathy and price cuts.  The seller then feels bad and caves in.  Even the best sellers are taken by these tactics when the buyer plays his part well.

The Counter Strategy

1. First, it’s important that you know what your product is worth.  I knew the blue book values of my van…so I had this one covered.

2. Don’t try to shoe-horn your product or service into situations where it isn’t really a good fit.  In my case, I was not doing this – it was the buyer who called me, yet  I do see sales people trying to make their expensive products play in the SMB, while smaller companies accept projects that they are just unqualified to do.  In both cases, the pricing is often inconsistent with the real value of the project.

3. Don’t mark your close probability at 100% until the deal is done.  When I get a verbal commitment, it’s 90% – if an economic buyer gives the verbal. A verbal from an IT person, representing a new client, should be considered 20%.  In the case of my van, I was thinking 100% when he said he liked it.  I became emotionally involved in the transaction and gave into his tactics.   Looking back I realize this buyer was a shrewd businessman.  He knew what he was doing.

4. Stand firm.  If the buyer starts whining, go back to success stories, or offer to provide additional consulting with additional fees.  Nothing really works out of the box in the IT world, so assume there is work to be done.  If he can’t afford it, offer some less expensive options.  Chances are he is just working you on price.

© 2011, David Stelzl

Advertisements

Here are some ways to increase fees without penalizing your clients.

  1. Measure risk – Impact and likelihood, of a disaster, jointly place a value on it and set your fee accordingly.
  2. Look for problem areas that consistently show up across the companies you do business in.  Come up with solutions and use this material to call higher.
  3. Trade product gross profit for recurring revenue.  This builds annuity rather than a one-time transaction.
  4. Use Assessments rather than traditional open-ended questions to discover larger opportunities.
  5. Be willing to give away assessments in order to reach higher-level people in the account.  This leads to selling larger value priced deals.
  6. Propose options to build adjacent business in the accounts you are already working.
  7. Build greater expertise into your consulting group to offer more complex solutions
  8. Develop presentation skills that appeal to the executive level.  You’ll find that you are worth more to them than the next guy.
  9. Pass up smaller transactions to create more time for complex deals that offer greater reward.
  10. Develop stronger marketing programs to position your company as the expertise leader, rather then the low price leader.

© 2011, David Stelzl

http://www.stelzl.us/business_strategy_TeleS.asp

Tomorrow at 11:30 est I’ll be covering fees in much greater detail – by request, I did change tomorrows topic to “fees”.  Everyone struggles with this, everyone paid on gross profit is hurt by this. One of the most important changes you can make in 2011 is how you price projects and how much margin is realized per deal.  Doing thousands of small deals is exhausting, so learn how to increase deal size, gross profit, and value price.

The program is one hour, it will be recorded, and all those who sign up will receive a free recording of it on Monday.

Remember, if you are attending, feel free to submit questions and issues by email prior to the meeting.  I will cover as many as I can based on relevance.

Here is the link: http://www.stelzl.us/business_strategy_TeleS.asp

© 2010, David Stelzl