Archives For Kaspersky

img_4188

Stage Set Up

300 Security Leaders Meeting in Miami

Looking for More Tools to Combat Cybercrime!

I’m just heading back from meeting with over 300 CISOs and CIOs, all part of the Florida International Banker’s Association –  Celaes Event, at the Trump Hotel, Doral.  

Great event, very well run, and an opportunity to connect with security leaders from all over Central and South America.  I was also able to reconnect with old friends from Kaspersky and Dimension Data.

Here are a few pictures…You’ll notice Former Mayor Giuliani on stage as well!  The living room shot was part of my amazing suite…

And I’m leaving just in time to avoid Matthew, the latest hurricane headed this way.

 

Advertisements

I arrived yesterday in time to visit the expo, attend sessions with Cisco, Palo Alto, Kaspersky and a few others, adding at least one new t-shirt to my collection.  The highlight of my trip out was sitting next to a mother holding her restless 1-year old, who spilled coffee on my sleeve, knocked the creamer onto the floor and almost into my shoe, kicked my leg for 5 and half hours, and insisted on resting his head on my arm most of the trip. What a great character building session this was!

Tomorrow I’ll be speaking on the topic of how to create new business opportunities using educational marketing programs and assessments…but first, time for a San Francisco pizza, which will probably be marginal at best.

View of the RSA Expo

San Francisco under cloudy skys

Shooting in the Dark

February 10, 2011 — Leave a comment

Yesterday I mentioned Covey’s second habit – Beginning with the end in mind…how does this work in practice?

When planning a sales call, “the end”, or meeting outcome must be the first consideration!  Doing otherwise wastes both yours and the prospects time.  What should the call outcome be?  Almost every company I work with can tell me what tends to lead to a sale.  For instance, last week I was speaking at a software company’s partner summit.  They quoted a statistic showing that ninety percent of their “Proof of Concept” initiatives lead to a buying decision.  In another national sales meeting I spoke at, an access assurance company presented a similar statistic.  One reseller client I work with on quarterly marketing events says that he closes follow-on projects for ninety percent of the complementary assessments he offers.  With this in mind, they are generally able to quantify what qualifies their proof of concept effort, who should be involved, and how to run the program.  This is the goal, to get to this point with these people.  On the other hand, my non-scientific surveys show that companies are closing about ten percent of their proposals; even among companies who have shared their key to success as stated above.  What that tells me is we are writing the proposals before getting to that predictable key point in the sales process, or we just have not identified it yet.   If you don’t know the end goal, you’re just shooting in the dark.  If you do know it, you may be wasting great opportunities.

© 2011, David Stelzl

Get a free copy of the House & the Cloud – click on the sidebar House & Cloud Link!

And make sure you check out the online training programs coming up in April – both are linked on the right-hand side bar!

© 2011, David Stelzl

Pizza in Cancun

Here in Cancun, or just south of the Cancun area.  And of course my trip would not be complete without trying the Mexican pizza!  Here is it to the left, served with hot sauce, ketchup,…but not grated cheese.  How does it rank?  Better than the Singapore pizza for sure, not like New York, but par with the India pizza which I had at least 5 times while in Bangalore late last year.  Overall it was a good experience for a quick lunch.

What has made this partner conference special?  Here are few highlights:

1.  First, Eugene Kaspersky running out on stage in his Ferrari Formula 1 racing outfit (of which he is a sponsor).  The question was raised, “How many resellers have dined with, or sat by the pool with the CEO of their strategic manufacturing partners?  It’s a great question – these partners are doing just that this week.  This guy is a real person!

Eugene Kaspersky Live

2.  Concrete information on how to grow your business.  I have had the pleasure of speaking with many partners and channel managers today – this is the recurring theme – the information is relevant.

3. Not too big, not too small.  This event is invitation only, so we have about 250 partners attending this week.  Getting around and meeting people is easy with this kind of crowd, making it easier to network, exchange ideas, and get to know people who are solving similar types of problems throughout the Americas.

4. Grand Velas – what a great destination!  It’s a bit hot, but given the weather in the states this week, who cares.  The meeting rooms are great, services is excellent, and the facilities are five star.  Very nice…(plus the pizza was pretty good).

5. Key take away – this company is committed to driving business through the channel without over distributing.   I’ve met some outstanding people on the Kaspersky side – all of them excited to be a part of this team and working hard to build the business.

Tomorrow I will be speaking first thing in the morning on how to leverage the discovery and assessment process to grow the business.  As with all security technology products, no one wants to spend money on insurance, but when a real need can be shown, sales cycles are quickly shortened.  Look for a recap on YouTube…which I’ll post tomorrow.

© 2011, David Stelzl

Preparing for my workshop with Kaspersky today, I came across this great article on SMB cyber crime targets.  Some great sound bites as you speak with business owners who don’t feel like they need your help (the following are sound bite quotes from the linked article below):

1. Hackers and computer criminals have lately been turning away from the impenetrable security systems of large corporations in order to reap the fruits of the vulnerable small business sector.

2. A hefty portion of small business owners have little to no cybers ecurity at all… 1/5  of all small businesses don’t use anti-virus software, 60% have unencrypted wireless networks, and 2/3 do not have a proper security plan in place.

3. cybercrime is undergoing a new phase by switching its focus to the susceptible assets of small businesses…85% of all business fraud occurs in small to medium-sized businesses.

4. Web-based threats are emerging as the most common form of cybercrime…total online theft for 2009 alone totaled over $1 trillion.

5. …only 60% of Level 3 businesses (just one level above mom-and-pop shops) have complied with the Payment Card Industry’s Data and Security Standards

Here’s a link to the entire article: https://www.infosecisland.com/blogview/5760-Small-Business-The-New-Target-for-Cybercriminals.html

SMB Sound bites

March 11, 2010 — Leave a comment

While working with the Kaspersky Marketing today in Boston I came across this list of sound bites.  You can read the entire article in USA Today …. this may help move some of the business owners you are working with to a realization that their small companies actually are targets – it’s not just the big banks who are at risk.  These may also work for those of you who are calling on regional banks – notice the impact on business (last bullet)…apparently the banks are not as secure as they lead us to believe.  (these come straight from the USA Today article posted in today’s paper)

  • 55% of businesses reported experiencing fraud in the last 12 months, with 58% enabled by online banking activities.
  • 80% of banks failed to catch fraud before funds were transferred out of their institution.
  • In 87% of fraud attacks, the bank was unable to fully recover assets.
  • 57% of the respondents that experienced a fraud attack were not fully compensated by their banks.
  • 26% were not compensated for any part of their losses.
  • 40% of defrauded businesses moved their banking activities elsewhere.

Note: when the paper says SMB – it is often referring to what many resellers consider mid-size, on down to the very small S-Corp type company.

© David Stelzl 2010