Archives For HIPAA

executive-1Three Things You Can Do To Earn A Seat At The Table

Continuing from yesterday’s topic on, Things Sales People Do That CIOs Hate, last week’s keynote also covered three things CIOs really need…and can’t easily get internally.

  • Security Intelligence.  Intelligence is the new security buzzword. Not that it’s new. But for years people have talked about “Defense in Depth”, “Zero Day Response”, “Layered Security,” etc.  Recent WSJ reports are telling us that just about every board meeting agenda allots about 30 minutes to security.  What do the leaders of that meeting want to know? They want a measure of risk – “What are the odds our company will get hit this year?”  Who, besides you can give them that information?
  • Advice on leveraging new technologies. In the interview I referenced yesterday, the CISO I was meeting with talked about his need for advisors. He can’t know everything, and his team is heads down on support issues, project implementations, and daily operations. They don’t have time to keep up with technology the way you do.  So rather than showing up with your corporate presentation, show up with research and examples. Knowing what other “like” companies are doing to compete will go a long way.  In the Interview he mentioned compliance as an area they constantly need more advice on…can you advise your clients on HIPAA, GLBA, PCI, etc.compliancy group
  • Trust. Most of the sales people out there are just trying to sell. Is that you? Do you care whether your product actually works, or delivers a benefit this client needs? If you do, and I hope you really do, you’re a minority. The great thing about security is, just about everyone needs new security. As threats evolve, and IT moves toward new disruptive technologies, the security strategy is constantly evolving. It’s safe to say that, regardless of who they end up buying from, they do need security. Make sure you are doing the things that earn that trusted advisor status. Security is a great place to start.

Copyright, 2016 David Stelzl

PS. Check out what Compliancy Group has to offer resellers…compliance offerings without going back to school for four years.

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IMG_9025We All Need To Keep The Learning Process Going

Spending Time With Successful People

How do I keep up?  Well it doesn’t hurt that I interview experts every month.  Last month I had the equivalent of an MBA course in HIPAA, preparing for and speaking with Marc Haskelson of the Compliancy Group.  Over the past several months I’ve had opportunities with former NSA and CIA agents, owners and presidents of highly successful resellers, and some of the highest producers at larger companies like Dell Secureworks, Accuvant, and Check Point Software.

Next month I’ll be hanging out with some million dollar producers in my own business in a 2 day planning and strategy mastermind meeting.  There’s nothing better than learning from your peers when you see them doing something great.

Morning Reading – Krebs, WSJ, Etc.

Another thing I do is read.  I always have a book going.  Right now I am working through an audio book on building your online platform, by Michael Hyatt.  I also read the WSJ CIO section each morning, and subscribe to Krebs on Security.  Here’s a tidbit from this morning’s post I found interesting … How do fraudsters “cash out” stolen credit card data? Increasingly, they are selling in-demand but underpriced products on eBay that they don’t yet own. Once the auction is over, the auction fraudster uses stolen credit card data to buy the merchandise from an e-commerce store and have it shipped to the auction winner. Because the auction winners actually get what they bid on and unwittingly pay the fraudster, very often the only party left to dispute the charge is the legitimate cardholder.”

Conferences Are Great For Networking and Learning

And today, as you read this post, I am headed out to Denver Colorado to attend the Information Marketers Summit with Robert Skrob, President of the Information Marketing Association.  IMA is code for online training programs like the Security Sales Mastery Program on my website.  If you’re in the high tech industry, you can’t afford to work so hard that you don’t have time to read, network, and attend training.  As you start looking at your 2016 two things I recommend doing. First, figure out when you are going on vacation, and block that time out.  Also block out any important days such as your spouses birthday or your anniversary.  Second, figure how what kind of training you need to get and how you’re going to get it.  If you’re not growing, you’re shrinking.

© 2015, David Stelzl

PS. Don’t forget, many of you qualify for free training. I have several sponsors who are willing to put you through the Security Sales Mastery Program – normally $450/seat!  Contact me to find out if you qualify for a seat!

In case you missed my recent interview with Marc Haskelson

Here’s a short clip on the difference between security and compliance (Specially HIPAA, but Marc’s answer applies to just about every compliance regulation I can think of – PCI, GLBA, SOX, etc). The gap is big and healthcare companies are paying for their lack of knowledge on this subject! When there’s confusion in the marketplace, there’s also opportunity. You can learn more about how to tap this market right here.  Just click the Compliancy Box.

© 2015, David Stelzl

compliancy group

HIPAAHIPAA Isn’t Helping

If You Want To Help Sure Up Security, Start With HIPAA

As I mentioned in yesterday’s post, I’ll be interviewing Marc Haskelson later today, Founder and President of The Comliancy Group. He didn’t write the HIPAA requirements, but he understands them, and knows which of your clients need HIPAA.  He also knows where it falls short.

HIPAA Is Not Security – It’s A Government Law

Do you know what HIPAA stands for?  Google it and you’ll come up with more than one answer…if you’re going bring it up in a meeting, make sure you know.  Here it is: Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act. (Note, it’s not the information portability act, and it’s not HIPPA).

It would have been great if the authors of HIPAA understood technology and security. The fact is, many of your clients either require HIPAA compliance, or will in the near future. The problem is, “HIPAA isn’t helping” healthcare security according to Gary McGraw, CTO of Cigital (a leading software development firm headquartered in Dulles, VA.)  If you’ve read my book, The House & The Cloud, 2nd Edition, you know I agree.  There’s a large chasm between compliance and security, but regardless, HIPAA is required.

In a recent study, “Healthcare overwhelmingly scored lower than financial services firms, ISVs, and consumer electronics firms, which include some Internet of Things providers.” according to Kelly Jackson Higgins, in an article posted on DARKReading.

As McGraw states it, “All [HIPAA] did was increase bureaucracy and the tiny print stuff handed out each time you go to the doctor. It over-focused the healthcare domain on privacy and patient privacy data, which is an important thing. But there are many other aspects of security that have little to do with privacy.”

The real problem with HIPAA is it has given doctors a false sense of security. In a recent healthcare conference I spoke at, every session that had something to do with security was all about HIPAA. When I gave my presentation, I started by asking the audience to forget about HIPAA for just one hour, and listen to what it means to be secure.  The response was one of surprise. No one had ever told these people that data, governed by HIPAA, was still at risk.

Over the past year we’ve seen numerous companies attacked, regardless of their HIPAA compliance efforts. To name just a couple; Anthem and UCLA Health come to mind.

I have a colleague who recently took a job with Websense.  This year they publised a study showing healthcare organizations are being hit 3 or 4 times as often as other firms by cyber attacks. Forbes noted in a recent article that healthcare data is worth 10 times that of credit card data on the black market.  A Trend Micro study shows that “nearly 27% of data breaches reported over the past decade occurred in the healthcare sector, and healthcare was the hardest hit by identity theft in the past 10 years, with 44.2% of those cases caused by insider leaks,” (Cited by the DARKReading article above).

Here’s The Problemcompliancy group

People think they are secure when they are compliant. HIPAA requires so much paperwork that the security issues get lost in the process. The financial companies know they’re a target, while a recent survey published by Trustwave reports that healthcare IT professionals don’t.

How can you get involved? First, where there’s a problem, there’s an opportunity.  I’m interviewing Marc today to get a better sense of what HIPAA really requires, and to show technology resellers how to get involved. Healthcare companies and their third-party providers both need help as well as education on HIPAA. The House & The Cloud Message was extremely effective in the healthcare conference I spoke at. For the first time their eyes were opened, and they saw the need. This kind of education opens doors of opportunity that are both helpful to your clients and profitable to your business.

Here are two things you can do…

First, visit the Compliancy Group Site to get more information on how to become a HIPAA Security Provider. Marc will do everything he can to help you get up and running with minimal time and investment.

Second, enroll in the Security Sales Mastery Program – If you qualify with one of the many sponsors supporting this program, I can get you a free seat (Normally $450).  Contact me and we’ll find a way to get you into the program.

© 2015, David Stelzl

compliancy groupHIPAA Is Important!

Tomorrow I will be interviewing Marc Haskelson, President of The Comliancy Group.

Marc’s team works with technology resellers to address HIPAA in the small and mid size markets, providing tools and professional services to take your clients through the process. Tomorrow’s interiew will not be broadcasted to the public;  it’s an exclusive session for the SVLC Insider’s Circle. However, you’ll want to download some information if you are doing anything with Security or Managed Security Services.  Here’s the link to learn more:

Find Out How You Can Get Paid to Help Your Clients Become HIPAA Compliant  <<< CLICK HERE!

© 2015, David Stelzl

Ingram Webinar ScreenYou Can’t Afford to Ignore The Security Trends

This Just May Be Your Biggest Growth Opportunity

On Sept 18th Ingram Micro invited me to to present a security update to resellers.  This is one of the most important messages you’ll see this year as you consider what to do to prepare for 2016. Don’t let the Q4 rush keep you from doing some serious planning.  The next 5 years of your business depend on it!

Replay the webinar right here  (CLICK).  << Access the webinar replay now…

Growth Opportunities:

  • Don’t forget, Ingram Micro, along with numerous security manufacturers including Websense, Bit9, Cisco, Fortinet, and more, are offering free seats from my Security Sales Mastery Program!  You can contact my team through this blog to find out if you’re business qualifies for these free seats.
  • Both Check Point Enterprise and Check Point SMB resellers may also qualify for Check Point Sponsored seats in the Security Sales Mastery Program – Contact us through this blog if you are a reseller, or are considering Check Point as a partner.
  • HIPAA Compliance! Do you work with businesses that must become and maintain HIPAA Compliance? This may seem out or reach, but it’s not.  If you’re interested in learning how you can build a strong HIPAA practice, contact my team. We have recently partnered with The Compliancy Group and can help you make the jump into this lucrative market!
  • Marketing Events Are More Successful Than Ever! Next Wednesday I will be presenting to 30 business leaders in the Mid Atlantic Area.  The sponsor, a local reseller, was able to attract 30 business leaders in about 4 weeks using our Marketing Success Kit.

© 2015, David Stelzl

I’ve spent the week interviewing presales consultants in the Chicago area this week…next week I’ll be teaching a sales class to presales engineers over in Singapore (yes, its live onsite).  This is an under-served group needing some attention in most organizations.

An Undefined Job

When I talk with a presales consultant (A job I personally have quit of bit experience doing), I am struck by the varying definitions and responsibilities these people give when asked, “What do you do?”  It’s kind of undefined.  This make the hiring process difficult.  It’s not like sales where the person simply says, “I sell stuff.”  Some interface with very technical people and therefore spend most of their time staying up on very technical things.  Some do a lot of speaking, others don’t.  Some design for free, some are generalists, and still others are product specialists.  The commonality is, few have ever had any formal sales training.

Yet, these people are expensive, largely non-billable, and as most sales people would agree, critical to the selling process. A great presales consultant is worth their weight in gold, and many sales people are asking for more resources in this area.

Considerations

A few things your sales organization should consider:

  • Clearly define this role.  Since these people are expensive, it makes sense that the sales management should clearly write out the job description for this person, even though most of these people will not actually report to the sales manager (Something else to consider).  The description might look different for different organizations, but in most reselling organizations this person will be a shared technical resource.  I recommend resellers hire sales people with strong consultative sales skills, and then hire presales consultants (and stop calling them SEs) that are aligned with some area of expertise – such as security or data center, etc.
  • Pay them on commission.  These people should be responsible for driving business, so they should have some skin in the game.  More leverage means more risk – but risk and commission motivate strong work ethic and allow companies to pay out more to high performers.  The higher the risk/reward, the better, however, many of the candidates for this job are not interested in a 50/50 split or more on commission.  At some point, higher risk takers will opt for sales jobs if they think they can take more home at the end of the year.  I also recommend making this a limited resource in your company, forcing sales people to set things up before actually taking this person in.  Reserve them for qualified calls only and use the phone often rather than making the trip to the client’s site – Webex also works well here, with the sales person onsite, and the consultant speaking from a remote location.
  • Train these people.  Sure, they get training – but most of it is product knowledge.  This is largely a waste of time. Hire presales consultants who are willing to do some reading and tell them to learn the products they support.  Let them visit with local vendors and Google the rest.  But then, teach them to sell.  Of all the people I have trained on sales and marketing, this group has been the most responsive and the most teachable.  Once they see how they can improve their game, and more importantly, communicate effectively with non-technical audiences, they get excited.  It is likely that your presales consultants feel confident in front of IT people, but lack confidence in front of C-Level people.  Training is the answer.
  • Teach them to present.  Another aspect of training is presentation.  Twice this week I had presales consultant candidates tell me, “You won’t be able to read my writing on the white board.”  Are you kidding? – in both cases I replied, “It’s a requirement of this position.”  They responded with a chuckle…I wasn’t laughing.  One candidate is currently enrolled in Toastmasters…this is a wise move.
  • Teach them to write.  Writing is not easy.  I guess we assume people can write, but there are all kinds of writing and not many technical people write well when it comes to addressing management in written form.  I once took a group of sales people through a class on writing called Information Mapping.  It was one of the best investments I have ever made.

© 2013, David Stelzl

P.S. If you are a presales consultant looking for a job, make sure you spell check all of those acronyms on your resume.  Since Word won’t  recognize most of them, it’s all up to you.  Is it HIPAA or HIPPA?  Two candidates failed on this point this week.