5 Important Security Sales Concepts

February 26, 2016 — Leave a comment

plug and playSelling Security is Not The Same As Selling Insurance

You can spin security a million ways to make it sound like there’s a return on investment, but you’re only kidding yourself.

So how exactly do you sell something that many people think they don’t need more of, and that really has no ROI?

I just wrapped up two training days with Brian NeSmith, President and CEO, and his team at Arctic Wolf, a security operation center that targets small and medium businesses.  As always I’m sure I learn more than anyone at these meetings.  And I have to say, I’m impressed with the technology and the team.

Arctic Wolf is exactly what small and medium businesses need as they move toward more IoT, mobility, and BYOD.  This morning as I’m wrapping things up and getting ready to head home for the weekend, a few key principles are on my mind…these are foundational mindsets every sales person must have if they want to sell security or managed services.

  • Security is not a product. Even if you are selling a product, don’t present it that way.
  • Every small and medium business needs more security. Specifically, they need the intelligence and insight into what’s going on in their network as they create and use data.  According to Gartner, 80% of these companies are working without any realtime detection element. Even if they have the UTM firewall, they probably don’t watch it. And if they did, they wouldn’t understand it. That means every one of these companies is a qualified prospect.
  • If budget comes up, something is wrong. Security is sold based on high impact of a likely event. Most decision makers won’t understand their risk, so start there. That means you’ll need to gain access to those decision makers early in the sales process – but not to show them your corporate presentation. Instead, talk to them about technology trends like IoT that will be used to grow their business.  That’s what they want to hear…then transition to the security risks that come with new technology.
  • The sale requires justification. Justification comes with getting them to see they have urgent issues – risk. Most assessments, like 90%, show urgent findings.  That’s justification. If you still can’t close, you are either talking to the wrong people, or hiding the urgency in the language you use. Be bold and upfront – be clear. People from China are potentially in your data!
  • Whatever you do, don’t get bogged down in the technology and how it works. This discussion can come later with the IT people – but the sale is made at the business level, and should be conceptually made before diving into the weeds.

For more on how to effectively sell security, check out The House & The Cloud…you can get it here for a limited time for $1.00 – free shipping, and no strings attached.

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