Archives For seth godin

Selling Yourself Short

September 23, 2011 — 1 Comment

Queenstown NZ

Seth Godin, writes in his book Linchpin, “The moment you are willing to sell your time for money is the moment you cease to be the artist you’re capable of being.”

What a great summary of the T&M (Time and Materials) approach to conducting business.  This goes not only for yourself, but for everything you represent when you take your offerings to market.   I was meeting with a very successful salesman yesterday, talking about his achievements in selling to major retail accounts.  At one point in the conversation he made the astute comment, “Sometimes I think sales people think to themselves – I’m just a sales guy.”  He followed up by commenting, “I never want to be just a sales person.”  Seth Godin’s comments are directed toward this very attitude – I’m just the sales-guy.

Don’t waste your time being the average sales person, hocking products at your local account.  The alternative is to do something great.  Become an innovator.  This is not something some are born with and others can’t be, but rather something each one of us cultivates as we read, exchange ideas with others, think, and improve each moment of each day.  Don’t sell yourself short, start building the skills that move you to that adviser position, a position of great value to those you market and sell to.

© 2011, David Stelzl

I love Seth Godin’s book, Permission Marketing.  In my recent webinar on Gaining Access to Decision Makers, I recommended reading this in the context of demand generation events and selling with assessments.

Gaining permission requires demonstrating value.  In last week’s demand generation event we targeted business owners from the start (rather than going to IT).  Normally I recommend meeting with IT people to better understand the business before calling into higher level people…but in this case we set the stage to make this work.

We arranged for this event to be held at an upscale location, I was brought in as a speaker (Speaking on the trends of Data Security and Cybercrime), and a follow up program was designed to show business leaders in the local community what is going on with cybercrime and how local businesses are under fire.  Our goal was to show them, as reported recently in the Wall Street Journal, that security is no longer a custodial issue, but that companies must have someone at the executive level overseeing this and reporting right to the top!  This was a perfect segue into a business-level technology conversation.  No products,  no tech talk, and no Power Point slides discussing the hosting company’s profits, employees, or certifications.  Instead, we created a reason for attendees to meet us.  45 out of 50 signed up for an assessment…this is a powerful statement as to the value we delivered.

Business leaders don’t have time for sales pitches, product slinging sales calls, or interruption type marketing campaigns.  They do have time to hear about trends that affect their business, and education relevant to the success of their company.  This requires permission, and permission requires demonstrable value.

© 2011, David Stelzl

In just 60 minutes of presentation, these attendees were willing to stay and talk.  They received books, signed up for assessments, and looked forward to our next visit, a visit that would take place in their office, with a focus on their risks.  They wanted to know how to ensure that global cyber thieves would not victimize their businesses.    In fact, we gained permission to see them three times!  The first meeting was at the luncheon.  From there they agreed to invite us to their office, and finally, we had permission to see them a third time to deliver our findings from the promised assessment.  If a sales person can’t close business with three executive meetings and compelling justification from an assessment, a new sales person is needed.

Here it is: (CLICK), a recording from yesterday’s Webex presentation on accessing decision makers…Also, over the past several webinars I have made some reading recommendations…

1. Let’s Get Real or Let’s Not Play: On this one I recommend the audio book…I’ve listened to this book dozens of times as he does a great job of getting down to business with busy executives that tend to give elusive answers to avoid being pinned down.

2. Made to Stick: Great book on Marketing.  I was recently talking to a young lady getting ready to head off to college for marketing – total waste of time.  Read  three or four books (this being one of them) and you’ll be way ahead of most marketing graduates.

3. Permission Marketing: Here’s another of my recommendations on marketing…I spoke about gaining permission through the demand generation / event process, and moving through the 4 meetings…these are simply practical steps of gaining permission.  Read what Seth Godin writes here and you’ll understand exactly what I am proposing in my Webinar.

4. The New Rules of Marketing and PR:  We haven’t mentioned this book yet, but it’s the third one to read on marketing.  As Social Media prevails, learn to use it in your business.

5. The House & the Cloud: I’ve mentioned this book countless times…yes it’s my book, and probably the only book specifically written to sales people on selling security technology.  You should read it…

© 2011, David Stelzl

Based on some of the follow up questions I received following Wednesday’s Webex on Effective Demand Generation I thought it might be helpful to add these points:

0. Don’t let the irritated, over-worked executive frustrate you or stifle your marketing plans…

1. Marketing, while considered to be very artsy, is very scientific.  Learn what motivates people, what turns them off, what causes them to be judgmental, and what creates open-mindedness.

2. The goal is to gain permission to continue the sales process.  Study Seth Godin’s book Permission Marketing for more insight on this.  Godin does a great job of explaining why marketing cannot be interruption driven, using mailings and billboard type selling.  This fits well with a consultative selling approach.  Events like we are describing here are just one step in gaining permission to consult and advise with decision makers.

3. Persuasion is an important concept.  I like the definition from our home school curriculum, “Guiding truth around other’s mental road blocks.”  Truth implies honest delivery of a client’s situation and your ability to improve it.  Roadblocks exist simply because the 95% you call on don’t really understand the issues like you do.  Demonstrate a need for risk mitigation or operational efficiency and you’re on your way to helping them.

4. Finally, remember that executives need your input.  Don’t shy away from communicating value.  Thousands of incompetent sales people have addressed this group in past meetings and phone calls, so don’t be surprised if there is some convincing to do up front.  If you have prepared properly, you are doing them a favor by contacting them.

© 2011, David Stelzl

Photo taken by Hannah Stelzl

Last night I had the privilege of  presenting new material on Entrepreneurial Thinking to a group of fathers and young men (mostly college age).  I thought it might be helpful to post a few comments to keep the learning process going:

1. Andrew Carnegie (in the early 1900s) wrote: Capitalists need compliant workers…willing to work for less than the value their productivity creates – this is profit….The answer to worker unrest is to build an educational industry designed to teach workers just enough to get them to cooperate.  My comment – don’t accept average…don’t give into this kind of thinking.  Get out of the box and do something great today.

 

2. In 1908 Publisher Henry Holt said, “There is too much enterprise, excessive overproduction of brains is the root cause…we must emasculate man’s entrepreneurial energy.”  My comment; Don’t let this happen!  Let someone else lose their ambition, but don’t you do it.

3. I meet people all the time who are wondering what they want to be when they “Grow Up”.  Many of these people are well established in business, in their 50s, yet, and unfulfilled.  Why?  Don’t just go with the flow, sit down and think, how do I want to spend my life and what is my fulfilling purpose going to be?  This is especially true for young people just entering or leaving college.  Don’t just go to class, build a resume, and look for a job.  Consider what great things are out there to do, then set about doing it.

4. Seth Godin Wrote, in his recent book, Linchpin; “Unskilled people are interchangeable – we’ve been culturally brainwashed.” He’s right you know.

5. We are too risk adverse!  Our training has taught us never to try anything that isn’t already proven to succeed.  We learned this from our teachers who insisted on us doing things a certain way; their way.  The alternative was an “F” – failure.  Entrepreneurs don’t think that way.  Innovation is key – start being creative simply by creating.  Assume most of your ideas will not be good, so set them aside and come up with new ones.

© 2011, David Stelzl

Continuing on with Habit 2 thinking, how does this apply with events and seminars?

When I conduct Data@Risk seminars, I am presenting educational material to business leaders, helping them establish better business practices that will better serve their customers and protect their company’s intellectual capital.  This has value in and of itself, but it does not lead to many sales without a game plan.  I’ve designed my keynote to guarantee three execute meetings, not just one.  The first meeting comes through the educational event.  My material is written to help business level people understand the risks, see why they may not be experiencing security violations when in fact they probably are, and finally to agree that it is important that they at least look to see if they have some of the more surreptitious security violations in progress within their applications.  I use marketing concepts to create urgency here, driving a certain reaction.  Knowing what I know about today’s cybercrime makes it easy to accomplish this because there really is a need!

The next two meetings follow.  Using Habit 2 thinking, I work with my client to develop a follow up assessment process that scales to fit the opportunity.  Some prospects are worth spending a great deal of time with, others not so much.  The discovery process requires executive involvement; if they don’t show up, we discontinue the process and continue the marketing effort until they do.  Once they agree to involvement (which is minimal by design), we go through the process identifying urgent issues.  Meeting three comes in at the time of delivering our findings.  Again, if the executive does not show up, we withhold the information (Since it is complementary, we can do that.)  Most often, those who agree to participate upfront will also avail themselves to the deliverable review.  By knowing ahead how we will get people signed up, how the follow up discovery process will be conducted, and how the deliverable will be presented, we can predict some level of success that is commensurate with our effort.   But it all starts with building the follow up program before the event ever begins.

© 2011, David Stelzl

If you’ve read Stephen Covey’s classic on life management, Seven Habits of Highly Successful People, you may remember habit 2, Beginning with the End In Mind.  This is key to any great sales call, marketing event, or other demand generation activity.  Having done many executive luncheons, one of my clients’ first questions is always, how many people should we invite.  On their mind is, “How many can we attract”.  My first question back is usually, “How many can you effectively follow up?”

Obviously there are the preparations that take place before a call, but what happens after you present?  Do you have a planned ending to your meeting that leads to, what Seth Godin terms, Permission?  And more importantly, do you have the bandwidth to stay on top of everyone who responds to your “program”?   Going in without a plan is like going in with a plan to waste your call list.

© 2011, David Stelzl

 

Some follow up comments from yesterday’s meeting with VARs / security resellers in the Bay area.

1. IT people naturally resist sales people who try to move up.  Positioning your technical experts along side IT people can give them a highly valuable connection, one that will help IT people gain the insights they need to increase their own value.  If this relationship holds real value, it frees the sales person to move up.  The IT person will not risk giving up a great technical contact just to block you.

2. Higher level contacts in general, must gain IT buy-in before making strategy technology decisions.  While this is not always the case, there is always a backlash when they don’t.  An assessment does not require the same approval process, making it a better lead in.  Once completed, you have the justification to move other project related services forward.

3.  Every sale should have an end-goal that includes recurring revenue.  Cloud services, hosted services, managed services – all fall into this category.

4. Justification for the recurring revenue portion of the sale should be made through an assessment and justified by risk related issues.  For instance, managed services is presented as a way of maintaining an acceptable level of risk.  When ROI is used, the contract’s life expectancy is much shorter.  Bean counters will be watching this monthly expense closely, and it will be the first to go when things get tight.

Note: here’s a shot from my hotel window in Santa Clara – interesting how things have evolved with Yahoo and Google.  Remember when Yahoo was a hot stock?  What would Seth Godin do if he were back at Yahoo now?  Yahoo would be lucky to get him.

Looking the other way, a shot of the mountains!  You know I’m thinking about backpacking as I sit here working on business items.

© 2010, David Stelzl

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Seth Godin

April 22, 2010 — Leave a comment

I just finished reading Seth Godin’s latest book, Linchpin, and I find myself quoting some of his thought provoking comments as I am encouraging sales people to be proactive in their businesses.  There is an urgent need refocus on learning and studying the business, the market, and the trends that are driving our industry.  He has some great thoughts here on what differentiates the average from the spectacular “linchpin” employee.  This audio link came in this morning with Godin’s permission to pass it on – it’s Seth talking about the Linchpin.  I hope you find this helpful as you build your business…

http://www.feedblitz.com/t2.asp?/198516/6203348/3827409/http://sethgodin.typepad.com/files/linchpinsessionsethgodinapril.mp3